Just hours after announcing a 2022 North American tour, Foo Fighters have canceled one of the shows which was to take place in Minneapolis, Minn. after the venue refused to adhere to the band’s COVID-19 safety measures.

“Due to Huntington Bank Stadium’s refusal to agree to the band’s COVID safety measures, Foo Fighters are unable to perform at that venue. We apologize for any inconvenience and are working on finding a suitable replacement — one that will prioritize the health and safety of everyone working and attending the show,” the band wrote in a statement on Twitter.

Foo Fighters’ 2022 tour kicks off on May 14 in Burgettstown, Pa. and finishes up on Aug. 20 in  Los Angeles, Calif. This particular Minneapolis show was to take place on Aug. 3. Huntington Bank Stadium, formerly known as TCF Bank Stadium until June of this year, is the University of Minnesota’s on-campus football stadium, and has a capacity of 50,805.

The Star Tribune notes that although the University of Minnesota has required students be vaccinated against COVID-19 as of October, the stadium in particular hasn’t been enforcing vaccination or negative test checks, or requiring masks. Furthermore, a spokesperson on behalf of the university confirmed that the stadium didn’t want to amend their policies for the Foo Fighters concert.

Earlier this year, Foo Fighters announced a handful of 2021 shows, including the reopening of New York City’s Madison Square Garden in June, which required fans to be fully vaccinated in order to attend. Since then, they’ve implemented different COVID-19 preventative measures in order to go to their shows, whether it be proof of vaccination or a negative test.

Foo Fighters also added another show following this morning’s tour announcement. They’ll be playing the Merriweather Post Pavilion in Columbia, Md. on May 16. The pre-sale is now underway. See their tweet below for additional details.

Stay tuned for further updates on the tour.

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